We use cookies to improve your experience, some are essential for the operation of this site.
Dying Confession, Behaviour, and Letters of George Thom
of 62

Dying Confession, Behaviour, and Letters of George Thom

Historic Documents
Costanza Careddu
This item is active and ready to use
Dying Confession, Behaviour, and Letters of George Thom
Historic Documents
478
Dying Confession, Behaviour, and Letters of George Thom
This broadside reports the circumstances around the crime and punishment of George Thom. This resident of Harthill in the parish of Newhills was executed on 16th November 1821 for having poisoned his brother-in-law, William Mitchell of Burnside, Keig, in order to inherit his possessions. The witnesses and evidence against him left him with no other choice than to confess his crime.

The document presents Thom as an astute and sagacious 61-year-old man whose life was ruined by avarice. He is introduced more as a sinner than as a criminal, and the references to religion are numerous. Moreover, emphasis is given to his final repentance and contrition, a motive to praise the work of the attending Clergymen.

The broadside makes reference to Rev. Mr. Thom, Ordinary of the Prison, and Rev. Dr. James Kidd (1761-1834).

Besides his confession and a letter addressed to the family of the victim, the broadside reports a declaration signed by Thom in which he certified the complete innocence of his wife. Indeed, in an article published on the Aberdeen Journal on 5th September 1821 we read that both he and his wife were suspected for the crime at the beginning of the investigation. She was eventually considered innocent.

This broadside was printed by J. Booth, Jnr., of Chronicle Street, Aberdeen.
Broadside
HD04_06
Crime
Aberdeen Local Studies
Yes
Other Items Like This
The Dying Confessions of William Gordon and Robert McIntosh
The Last Speech and Confession of Alex Martin